Crowned Crane Flight Show - Ngorongoro Crater - Tanzania

Rwanda Wildlife Conservation Association

Rwanda Wildlife Conservation Association is using a holistic and multi-disciplinary approach to reverse the declining trend of the endangered Grey Crowned Cranes in Rwanda, with a focus on stopping the illegal trade.

Grey Crowned Cranes (Balearica regulorum) are a symbol of wealth and longevity in Rwandan culture, and face increasing threats due to habitat reduction and illegal trade. Rwanda is a small country with an incredible variety of bio-diversity, yet it is challenged by high population density and extreme poverty. This results in resources and land being overstretched and high competition between people and wildlife.

Additionally, Grey Crowned Cranes have been kept in captivity by hotels and by wealthy families who are unaware of the environmental consequences of doing so. These captive cranes are usually stressed, malnourished, have their wings broken to prevent them flying, don’t breed and die prematurely. In addition, there has been a general lack of awareness in Rwanda about the endangered status of cranes and the law protecting them.

Learn more about Rwanda Wildlife Conservation Association

Himba Woman in Remote Northern Namibia - Photo by Louise McGowan

Conservation Travel Foundation

The Conservation Travel Foundation was founded in 2006 by Tristan Cowley, later also a co-founder of Ultimate Safaris. From the onset, the objective of the Foundation was to partner with Conservation Travel to bring about tangible, positive impacts on ecosystem conservation and on the socio-economic development of rural communities in Namibia.

The early efforts of the Foundation raised a mere few hundred dollars a year. It now raises, and deploys, in excess of US$ 250,000 a year for conservation and rural development projects in Namibia.

Innovation and determination by many remarkable people and organisations have given Namibia one of Africa’s most amazing wildlife recovery stories. Desert-adapted black rhino, elephant, lion, Hartmann’s mountain zebra and giraffe have all emerged from populations on the brink of local extinction, to roam north western Namibia in healthy, if fragile, numbers. Throughout the country populations of wildlife of every description have increased dramatically – due in no small part to the establishment of Community Conservancies on Communal Land, the advent of legal ownership of wildlife on private land, and a facilitative Ministry of Environment and Tourism.

Conservation minded travelers are already making a positive impact as they embark on their life enriching journey, just by visiting Namibia. However, the effects of this can reach even further, and much of the real impact comes from partnerships formed with like-minded individuals and entities with similar values.

Learn more about the Conservation Travel Foundation

Desert Lion Conservation

Desert Lion Conservation, or the “Desert Lion Project”, as it is often referred to, is a small non-profit organisation dedicated to the conservation of desert – adapted lions in the Northern Namib. Our main focus is to collect important base-line ecological data on the lion population and to study their behaviour, biology and adaptation to survive in the harsh environment. We then use this information to collaborate with other conservation bodies in the quest to find a solution to human-lion conflict, to elevate the tourism value of lions, and to contribute to the conservation of the species.

Addressing the conflict between people and wildlife requires striking a balance between conservation priorities and the needs of the people who share their land with wildlife. Managing human-lion conflict in the arid environment of the Kunene Region is complex. Sporadic and variable rainfall patterns, typical of arid environments, result in large overlapping home ranges amongst the lions that often clash with local farmers in search of suitable grazing for their livestock. However, lions are important to the growing tourism industry and there is an urgent need to manage the clashes between people and lions in the region. Understanding the population demography and behaviour ecology of the lion population is essential to this process.

Learn more about Desert Lion Conservation

Dian Fossey Fund

The Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International is dedicated to the conservation, protection and study of gorillas and their habitats in Africa. Their successful, integrated approach includes close collaboration with local governments and communities as well as partners from around the world

The Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund has more than 50 years of successful conservation work in saving gorillas based on a holistic model with four key parts: direct, daily protection of gorillas; scientific research on gorillas and their ecosystems; educating the next generation of scientists and conservationists in Africa; and helping local people with basic needs, so that communities can thrive and work together

Learn More About The Dian Fossey Fund

African Parks

African Parks is a non-profit conservation organization that takes on the complete responsibility for the rehabilitation and long-term management of national parks in partnership with governments and local communities. African Parks currently manage 19 national parks and protected areas in 11 countries covering over 14.2 million hectares in: Angola, Benin, Central African Republic, Chad, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Malawi, Mozambique, the Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Zambia and Zimbabwe

The organization was founded in 2000 in response to the dramatic decline of protected areas due to poor management and lack of funding. African Parks utilizes a clear business approach to conserving Africa’s wildlife and remaining wild areas, securing vast landscapes and carrying out the necessary activities needed to protect the parks and their wildlife. African Parks maintains a strong focus on economic development and poverty alleviation of surrounding communities to ensure that each park is ecologically, socially, and financially sustainable in the long-term

Learn More About African Parks

African Pangolin Working Group

The African Pangolin Working Group (APWG) was established on 27 June 2011, following an inaugural meeting by a diverse group of people who all have one passion in common – understanding and protecting pangolins in Africa

The APWG’s objectives are encompassed by its mission statement: “The African Pangolin Working Group will strive towards the conservation and protection of all four African pangolin species by generating knowledge, developing partnerships and creating public awareness and education initiatives”

Learn More About The African Pangolin Working Group

Zambezi Elephant Fund

The Zambezi Elephant Fund (ZEF) works collaboratively with the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Authority, NGOs and the private sector to develop, implement and manage: anti-poaching operations, field equipment and supplies for rangers and support teams, anti-poaching ranger training, conservation security planning and implementation, information systems and networking, technology and systems for anti-poaching operations, community livelihood programs, habitat restoration initiatives, and education and awareness delivery

ZEF has, in collaboration with their partners, built an anti-poaching reaction ranger base, conducted multiple aerial surveys, supplied equipment and rations to rangers, run training programmes, held collaborative workshops, funded three deployment vehicles, a patrol boat and driver/coxswain, funded a dedicated light aircraft for Flying for Wildlife, set up a highly effective illegal wildlife crime unit with Zimbabwe Republic Police’s MFFU, and kickstarted a crucial community-based sustainable habitat programme around tree planting and innovative cookstoves

Learn More About The Zambezi Elephant Fund

Amboseli Trust for Elephants

The Amboseli Trust for Elephants aims to ensure the long-term conservation and welfare of Africa’s elephants in the context of human needs and pressures through scientific research, training, community outreach, public awareness and advocacy

Amboseli was chosen because the elephants were relatively undisturbed in the sense that they were not fenced in, were still moving freely in the ecosystem, and were not being heavily poached. The Amboseli Trust for Elephants aims to gather base-line data on the biology of a “natural” population and most importantly they want to study elephants by following individuals over time. More than 40 years later, some of the same individuals are still being followed since 1972 as well as all the Amboseli elephants that have been born since the start of the Trust. Much of what is collectively known today about wild African elephants is based on these studies

Learn More About The Amboseli Trust for Elephants

Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust

Working to protect the legendary ecosystems and astounding biodiversity of East Africa through conservation efforts that directly benefit wildlife, wilderness and the local Maasai communities

The world increasingly relies on many traditional communities like the Maasai to protect the ecological treasures that exist within the land that they own. But the incredible wilderness and wildlife of Africa’s grasslands and the famous culture of the Maasai people both face daunting threats to their long-term survival. The fate of both rests with the Maasai themselves as they work to figure out how to benefit from their incredible natural resources while protecting and preserving them at the same time

The Trust funds and operates a range of programs aimed at protecting wilderness and wildlife. Our success comes from promoting sustainable economic benefits to the local Maasai community, thereby encouraging their active participation as stewards of our critical ecosystem. Lease payments for conservancies, carbon credits, wildlife monitoring and security, conservation and ecotourism employment…these are just some of the ways MWCT is creating a cutting edge model of successful community-based conservation

Learn More About The Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust

Project Ranger

Project Ranger fills a critical gap in wildlife monitoring, surveying, and anti-poaching operations of existing NGO’s in Africa through an emergency fund supporting those on the front-lines of conservation. Contributions from private individuals, foundations, and corporate partners will supplement budget deficits with local ground partners by funding salaries, training, and operations of wildlife monitors, rangers and anti-poaching personnel.

The COVID-19 pandemic’s ripple effects are broad; leaving virtually no industry, economy, or continent immune. As travel and tourism has been brought to a standstill, many wilderness areas are left vacant and workers left with uncertainty of personal income. This “perfect storm” of conditions is leaving many endangered animals highly vulnerable to wildlife crime.

 

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Learn more about project ranger

conservation through public health

Conservation Through Public Health

Conservation Through Public Health (CTPH)  is a non-profit, non-governmental organization with an innovative methodology that focuses on the interdependence of wildlife and human health in and around Africa’s protected areas. CTPH has three integrated strategic programs: Wildlife Conservation, Community Health and Alternative Livelihoods. Poverty alleviation and improving rural public health will contribute to greater biodiversity conservation and sustainable development in and around Africa’s protected areas.

Conservation is rooted in earning the support of the local communities who share a backyard with some of the most biodiverse wildlife in the world. Many of the most isolated and impoverished families live around protected areas in Africa—their lifestyles imposing an imminent threat to the survival of wildlife and habitats and eventually, themselves. Land encroachment, competition for food, and the spread of zoonotic disease between people, wildlife and livestock are all grim everyday realities.

CTPH has three main strategic programs: Gorilla Conservation, One Health and Alternative Livelihoods. Poverty alleviation and improving rural public health will contribute to greater biodiversity conservation and sustainable development in and around Africa’s protected areas.

Learn more about Conservation through Public health

Mother Africa Trust

The Mother Africa Trust was born out of the belief that, through effective volunteer eco-tourism and legitimate community collaborations a better future can be built for the rural communities in Zimbabwe. The Mother Africa Trust has facilitated the socio-economic development and empowerment of rural communities in Matopos and Hwange District. 

Ever since we began in 2006, Mother Africa has worked tirelessly to make a positive and lasting difference in Zimbabwe. Mother Africa Trust’s top mission is to establish effective and sustainable projects that will improve the living conditions and the economic status of disadvantaged communities in Zimbabwe.

In recent years Mother Africa Trust has made significant positive steps towards offering children an equal opportunity to learn. Particular emphasis is given to orphans and vulnerable children as these make up a higher percentage of school dropouts if ever there were luck to see the doors of a classroom. Our Academic Scholarship programme offers full funding to deserving students from identified rural communities. The programme aims to support children who have not had the same educational benefits or opportunities in life as others.

LEARN MORE ABOUT AMALINDA’S 30 FOR 30 FUNDRAISER

 


Learn more about Mother Africa Trust

 

Victoria Falls Elephant Sanctuary

Wild Horizons has been built over decades of family values to provide amazing experiences for visitors throughout Zimbabwe. Elephants became part of the Wild Horizons family in 1992 when four elephants needed a better home. Since that day, Wild Horizons has had an unwavering belief that the elephants welfare takes precedence. Whether is is during a rescue, the rehabilitation or release, it is all about the elephants’ future. That strong conservationist ethic has provided expansive training for the elephants’ keepers as well as a safe haven for elephants ever since

Wild Horizons main goal is to ensure the elephants have the best care and quality of life in the most natural environment. The team works all year long to care for our elephants as well as contribute to local and worldwide efforts for better education and conservation

Learn More About Victoria Falls Elephant Sanctuary

Zambian Carnivore Programme

The Zambian Carnivore Programme (ZCP) is a Zambian-registered non-profit organization dedicated to conserving large carnivores and the ecosystems they reside in through a combination of conservation science, conservation actions, and a comprehensive education and capacity-building effort

ZCP now works across Zambia in most of the country’s key ecosystems for large carnivores and their prey following a three-pronged interdisciplinary approach to fulfill its goals, and the success of this work fundamentally rests on our diverse and effective collaborations with local, national and international partners, agencies, organizations and institutions that collectively provide the expertise, resources and energy to address the myriad conservation challenges facing Zambia and the region.

Learn More About The Zambian Carnivore Programme

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Lower Zambezi REDD+ Project

The Lower Zambezi REDD+ Project (VCS ID 1202) is Zambia’s first Verified Carbon Standard verified REDD+ project. Lower Zambezi National Park forms part of a globally significant trans-frontier conservation area home to important elephant, lion and other wildlife populations. The Lower Zambezi REDD+ Project provides a vital buffer area to this important park, protecting over 60 kilometers of threatened boundary. This project partners with 7,182 people in Rufunsa District to conserve the forest through a set of livelihood and community development initiatives

The Lower Zambezi REDD+ Project has achieved 7 successful VCS verifications and has also achieved `gold` level validation against all three categories of the Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standard for its exceptional climate change impacts and community and biodiversity benefits

Learn More About The Lower Zambezi REDD+ Project

Project Luangwa

Project Luangwa is a charitable organization formed by a handful of Safari Operators of South Luangwa as a part of the commitment to responsible tourism. Their aim is to create an effective, coordinated approach to helping local communities improve their long-term economic prospects whilst avoiding a negative impact on the environment and wildlife

Project Luangwa believes as a charity operating in Zambia that by developing and improving education in schools and creating training opportunities families have the chance of a lasting and sustainable income

Learn More About Project Luangwa

Conservation South Luangwa

Conservation South Luangwa was formed in 2003 by a handful of like-minded safari operators and concerned stakeholders whose vision was to help protect South Luangwa. CSL is dedicated to protecting South Luangwa, it’s wildlife and habitat through a combination of law enforcement support (anti-poaching), human-wildlife conflict mitigation, veterinary work and community outreach

Since CSL was created, there has always been a firm belief in keeping it a majority Zambian staffed organization, the most obvious reason being sustainability and ownership. What started as a team of 5 dedicated staff fifteen years ago, has now grown into a team of 85 wildlife conservationists

Learn More About Conservation South Luangwa

Conservation Lower Zambezi

Conservation Lower Zambezi (CLZ) is a non-profit organization committed to the protection of wildlife and to the sustainable use of natural resources in the Lower Zambezi in Zambia

Since its humble beginnings with basic support to the wildlife authority, CLZ has grown and increased its activities and efforts in the Lower Zambezi. Not only has CLZ’s support to DNPW increased substantially over the years, the organization now also runs an Environmental Education Programme (2004), a Community Scout Unit (2013), a Community Engagement Programme (2013), a Detection and Tracking Dog Unit (2015) and a Rapid Response Unit (2018). CLZ also hosts the annual Safari Guides Training courses and exams for the Lower Zambezi (2001)

Learn More About Conservation Lower Zambezi

Pangolin Crisis Fund

The threat to pangolins is severe and there is no time to lose, that is why the Wildlife Conservation Network (WCN) and Save Pangolins created the Pangolin Crisis Fund in partnership with the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation

The Pangolin Crisis Fund (PCF) has one goal: Eliminate the demand, trafficking, and poaching crisis that puts all eight species of pangolins at risk of extinction

The PCF aims to achieve this goal by investing in the best projects to stop the poaching of pangolins, stop the trade and demand for pangolin products, and raise the profile of this little-known animal

Learn More About The Pangolin Crisis Fund

Kyambura Gorge Eco-tourism Project

The Kyambura Gorge Eco-tourism Project has undertaken a series of activities since 2009 to safeguard the Kyambura Gorge ecosystem

Today, Volcanoes Safaris and Volcanoes Safaris Partnership Trust are the single largest stakeholders in the Gorge ecosystem after the Ugandan Wildlife Authority. Without the intervention of VS and VSPT, the survival of the gorge and chimps would be under severe threat

Learn More About Kyambura Gorge Eco-tourism Project

Volcanoes Safaris Partnership Trust

The Volcanoes Safaris Partnership Trust (VSPT), established in 2009, is a non-profit organisation that connects Volcanoes’ Rwanda and Uganda luxury lodges to the neighbouring communities and conservation activities. The VSPT receives funding through Volcanoes Safaris, which contributes $100 from safari bookings, as well as private donations by our guests and others

The VSPT aims to create long-term, self-sustaining projects that enrich the livelihoods of local communities, promote the conservation of the great apes, restore natural habitats and work with communities and institutions to reduce human-wildlife conflict. As part of their stay at Volcanoes Lodges, guests get an opportunity to visit VSPT projects and to share the lives of the local communities

Learn More About The Volcanoes Safaris Partnership Trust

Singita: Grumeti Fund Canine Unit

Protecting the western corridor of the Serengeti from the threat of illegal hunting is a critical part of the Grumeti Fund’s role as custodian of this fragile ecosystem. Having worked to overcome the erstwhile neglect of this region and the subsequent environmental crisis, the now flourishing landscape and its abundant wildlife population remain at risk. The 120 hard-working anti-poaching scouts responsible for defending this habitat on a daily basis have recently received reinforcements in the form of four enthusiastic new recruits

Radar, Tony, DJ and Popo are the founding members of a brand new canine unit, responsible for detecting highly valued and trafficked wildlife contraband. The two chocolate Labrador mixes and two Belgian Malinois are rescue dogs from the United States who have been expertly trained by our partner, Working Dogs for Conservation (WD4C), to sniff out ivory, rhino horn, pangolin scales, ammunition, bush meat and snares, as well as to track people from the scene of a crime

 

 

Learn More About The Grumeti Fund Canine Unit

Kili & The Snoring Rhinoceros

In the quiet pre-dawn, our small group huddled together around the tea and coffee that the camp staff had so beautifully laid out. There was a ripple of excitement among my colleagues and fellow members of Safari Professionals–we were seeing a rhino receive a veterinary field check-up and be fitted with an electronic tracking device today! For some of us, this was a first time close encounter with the ‘nitty gritty’ of conservation work. We were thrilled to see conservation efforts we’re so passionate about in action! All of us support the incredible work being done by Map Ives and Rhino Conservation Botswana, and we couldn’t have been more grateful to the entire team from Wilderness Safaris for facilitating this once-in-a-lifetime experience.

When the time came, like the quiet creatures we were setting out to see, our group slowly moved toward our waiting helicopters. As the helis zipped us along to the rendezvous point, I marveled at how anyone could find a rhino in the vast landscape that is the Okavango Delta. Waves of hope and undercurrents of despair washed over me–hope that conservation efforts like these were having a positive impact for rhinos and despair that the situation is so dire that these operations are essential to the survival of this extraordinary species.  

We touched down, and our small group met with the team of veterinarians who had identified a large adult male White Rhino for darting. It was an individual who had been relocated to Botswana some 20 years ago. The vet expertly tranquilized the rhino so that he could be fitted for his electronic monitoring devices. The veterinary team would also measure and check his overall health to document his condition. As we approached by vehicle and then on foot, I had to gasp at the sheer size of the rhinoceros. He was massive and lying peacefully as the vets quickly got their samples and measurements.

In the awed silence while watching them work, I could hear the rhino’s slow rhythmic breathing and watch his chest expand with each inhale. We could examine his enormous horn closely–even seeing the tiny fibers which make up this valuable commodity. We were able to touch the soft skin of his underbelly and his coarse mud-covered back.

I was filled with hope and my eyes teared up as the vets efficiently set the tracking devices in place and revived the rhino. Within a minute, our rhino stood and carefully scanned the area before sauntering into the nearby bush.

Get in touch to learn more about hands-on conservation safaris


Fig the Leopard - Olare Motorogi Conservancy - Kenya

Kili’s Kenya Safari – October 2013 – Trip Report

After a few days of meetings in Nairobi and a stay at the lovely new Hemingways Hotel, my Kenyan safari began with a flight past Mt Kenya to the Northern Laikipia Plateau. Here, I spent 2 nights at Sabuk Lodge perched on a cliff overlooking the Ewaso Nyiro River. This privately-owned lodge remains a family home run by the entertaining owner, Verity, who hosts all the meals regaling with stories of her rich history in the safari industry. Verity coordinates each guest’s schedule with unique adventure activities such as walking or hiking excursions and Masai-guided camel safaris with stunning views of the Laikipia plains, Mount Kenya, the Karisa Hills and the Mathews Mountains in the North.

For me, the real highlight was a surprise breakfast out in the bush after we had just walked past a breeding herd of female elephants and their young. I also really enjoyed jumping into the Ewaso Nyiro River for a refreshing swim in the heat of the day and can’t wait to return to do a longer overnight walking safari sleeping out with a simple mosquito net under the stars!

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The Biggest Conservationists

This is a great editorial piece by National Geographic’s Steve Boyes. It’s long, but well worth the read. Plus, it’s full of some amazing photos. The gist of it lies in this quote:

Right now, tourists from around the world coming to Africa to photograph the continent’s wildlife are the biggest conservationists by far. The operators and establishment owners that attract these tourists by selling the dream of an African photographic safari are the new ambassadors for conservation.

And that’s why we love our clients. It’s your passion and curiosity that is helping protect the world’s wild life and wild places.

Thanks.