Safaris five years from now

25 years ago, when Next Adventure started offering custom, personalized safaris in Africa, it was considered an exotic niche experience for keen photographers, passionate birders and intrepid travelers. The entry requirements were complex, the standards of hospitality and guiding were inconsistent and there was virtually no glossy marketing photos or videos. 

Today, from the biggest celebrities to the royal family, safaris are celebrated as the pinnacle of luxury and adventure travel but still out-of-reach or off-the-radar for many. As popular destinations face damaging overtourism, particularly during narrow peak seasons, rates have sky-rocketed, and more brands are focusing on the ultra-high end of the luxury market.

 

Here at Next Adventure, we believe in the power of tourism to be a positive force in the lives of travelers as well as those communities who host, guide and care for us during our travels. With thoughtful choices and deliberate actions, sustainable ecotourism contributes to the protection of a wider footprint of wilderness as well as to the benefit of more remote communities who live with wildlife. 

 

5 ways safaris should change over the next 5 years

  • Greater representation of local communities in the ownership and management of tourism entities
    • Next Adventure supports sustainable ecotourism by promoting the most reputable operators as well as camps, lodges and conservancies that are owned, operated and managed by local communities. 

 

  • More awareness of safaris as an accessible and repeatable international travel option 
    • Next Adventure never talks about safaris as a once-in-a-lifetime experience. If you love nature and the outdoors, if you love animals, wildlife and adventure, there is a lifetime of experiences to be had on safari in Africa.

 

  • Increase in mid-career travelers, families and multi-generational groups
    • Next Adventure meets travelers where they are in their life, and we help find the safari that is right for them. We aren’t squeezing you into a scheduled trip or selling seats on predetermined itineraries.

 

  • Expanded safari calendar with more travel during green and shoulder season
    • Overtourism is a real concern in sensitive ecosystems. With all the focus on popular peak season safaris, Next Adventure celebrates more sustainable options that take pressure off of iconic destinations while also extending the benefits of tourism to more communities.

 

  • Progress in emerging destinations like Angola, Chad, Malawi and Mozambique
    • Prior to the pandemic, Next Adventure was excited to see good quality safaris developing in new areas. It takes a reliable pipeline of local talent, investments in infrastructure and robust market demand to make these destinations a success, and we’re looking for travelers who are ready to take the plunge.

 

Increasingly, the conservation of wild places and the livelihoods of remote communities rely on tourism, and one of the challenges ahead is how to grow ecotourism in a responsible and sustainable manner. Hopefully, we can inspire the next generation of international adventure travelers to love and explore the wilderness and consider more unique safari experiences.

 

 

Here’s our Top 10 Safaris for Every Kind of Traveler

Congo Peace School

The Congo Peace School provides an education to children unable to afford school fees, taking them off the streets, out of the mines, and into classrooms, so they are no longer easy targets of warlords. Education is a powerful tool for global change, and when given the opportunity for an education, these children can become productive leaders of Congo and become a solution with the capacity to reverse years of devastation

In addition to the Congolese school curriculum, the teachers and staff will be trained to integrate nonviolence and trauma support into the school system, creating education for leadership, to raise up peace leaders, and influence the future of Congo through its youth.


 

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Learn More About The Congo Peace School

 

Children in the Wilderness

Children in the Wilderness is a non-profit organization supported by ecotourism company Wilderness Safaris, which aims to facilitate sustainable conservation through leadership development and education of children in Africa

Children in the Wilderness increases children’s awareness, bridges cultural divides, broadens horizons, builds confidence, provides opportunities for new friendships, positive life choices, and reveals career opportunities

Learn More About Children in the Wilderness

Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust

Working to protect the legendary ecosystems and astounding biodiversity of East Africa through conservation efforts that directly benefit wildlife, wilderness and the local Maasai communities

The world increasingly relies on many traditional communities like the Maasai to protect the ecological treasures that exist within the land that they own. But the incredible wilderness and wildlife of Africa’s grasslands and the famous culture of the Maasai people both face daunting threats to their long-term survival. The fate of both rests with the Maasai themselves as they work to figure out how to benefit from their incredible natural resources while protecting and preserving them at the same time

The Trust funds and operates a range of programs aimed at protecting wilderness and wildlife. Our success comes from promoting sustainable economic benefits to the local Maasai community, thereby encouraging their active participation as stewards of our critical ecosystem. Lease payments for conservancies, carbon credits, wildlife monitoring and security, conservation and ecotourism employment…these are just some of the ways MWCT is creating a cutting edge model of successful community-based conservation

Learn More About The Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust

Mother Africa Trust

The Mother Africa Trust was born out of the belief that, through effective volunteer eco-tourism and legitimate community collaborations a better future can be built for the rural communities in Zimbabwe. The Mother Africa Trust has facilitated the socio-economic development and empowerment of rural communities in Matopos and Hwange District. 

Ever since we began in 2006, Mother Africa has worked tirelessly to make a positive and lasting difference in Zimbabwe. Mother Africa Trust’s top mission is to establish effective and sustainable projects that will improve the living conditions and the economic status of disadvantaged communities in Zimbabwe.

In recent years Mother Africa Trust has made significant positive steps towards offering children an equal opportunity to learn. Particular emphasis is given to orphans and vulnerable children as these make up a higher percentage of school dropouts if ever there were luck to see the doors of a classroom. Our Academic Scholarship programme offers full funding to deserving students from identified rural communities. The programme aims to support children who have not had the same educational benefits or opportunities in life as others.

LEARN MORE ABOUT AMALINDA’S 30 FOR 30 FUNDRAISER

 


Learn more about Mother Africa Trust

 

Kyambura Gorge Eco-tourism Project

The Kyambura Gorge Eco-tourism Project has undertaken a series of activities since 2009 to safeguard the Kyambura Gorge ecosystem

Today, Volcanoes Safaris and Volcanoes Safaris Partnership Trust are the single largest stakeholders in the Gorge ecosystem after the Ugandan Wildlife Authority. Without the intervention of VS and VSPT, the survival of the gorge and chimps would be under severe threat

Learn More About Kyambura Gorge Eco-tourism Project

Gahinga Batwa Village

With international attention on conservation of the endangered mountain gorillas, the Mgahinga part of the Virunga volcanoes in Uganda was turned into a national park in 1991 to provide protection to the wildlife from poaching and habitat encroachment. The creation of the park required the Batwa to be removed from their homes in the mountains and be displaced in a modern world unfamiliar to them. The Batwa ended up squatting in nearby farm land. They earned a living through occasional labor or begging. With limited education, adapting to the modern world has been a difficult journey. They do not have resources or land and suffer from acute poverty, malnutrition and poor health

A group of about 18 Batwa families from those displaced live in makeshift shelters on a tiny rocky site at Musasa, about 4km from the entrance of Mgahinga National park and Volcanoes Mount Gahinga Lodge, surviving as best as they can

Volcanoes Safaris has now built a permanent village for the Batwa community and their families. About 10 acres of land has been purchased to allow them to build homes, a community centre and have land for agricultural and recreational use. The homes were completed in early 2018 and the official launch of the village took place at the end of May 2018

Learn More About Gahinga Batwa Village

 

Volcanoes Safaris Partnership Trust

The Volcanoes Safaris Partnership Trust (VSPT), established in 2009, is a non-profit organisation that connects Volcanoes’ Rwanda and Uganda luxury lodges to the neighbouring communities and conservation activities. The VSPT receives funding through Volcanoes Safaris, which contributes $100 from safari bookings, as well as private donations by our guests and others

The VSPT aims to create long-term, self-sustaining projects that enrich the livelihoods of local communities, promote the conservation of the great apes, restore natural habitats and work with communities and institutions to reduce human-wildlife conflict. As part of their stay at Volcanoes Lodges, guests get an opportunity to visit VSPT projects and to share the lives of the local communities

Learn More About The Volcanoes Safaris Partnership Trust