Project Ranger

Project Ranger fills a critical gap in wildlife monitoring, surveying, and anti-poaching operations of existing NGO’s in Africa through an emergency fund supporting those on the front-lines of conservation. Contributions from private individuals, foundations, and corporate partners will supplement budget deficits with local ground partners by funding salaries, training, and operations of wildlife monitors, rangers and anti-poaching personnel.

The COVID-19 pandemic’s ripple effects are broad; leaving virtually no industry, economy, or continent immune. As travel and tourism has been brought to a standstill, many wilderness areas are left vacant and workers left with uncertainty of personal income. This “perfect storm” of conditions is leaving many endangered animals highly vulnerable to wildlife crime.

 

2020GP-ProjectRanger-Proposal-Final

 

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Akashinga All-female Anti-poaching Unit

In 2017 the IAPF’s Akashinga program was born and the first all-female, armed anti-poaching unit in the world was recruited and trained in an abandoned trophy hunting reserve in Zimbabwe. In the first 2.5 years Akashinga helped drive an 80% downturn in elephant poaching in Zimbabwe’s Lower Zambezi Valley, one of the largest remaining populations left on earth. Akashinga’s bold goal is to employ 1,000 female rangers that protect a network of 20 nature preserves under IAPF management by 2025

Akashinga is a platform for women to change the world for the better. It is women carrying out one of the most demanding and respected jobs in the world while thriving at it and building their own lives, their families and their communities in the process

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Singita: Grumeti Fund Canine Unit

Protecting the western corridor of the Serengeti from the threat of illegal hunting is a critical part of the Grumeti Fund’s role as custodian of this fragile ecosystem. Having worked to overcome the erstwhile neglect of this region and the subsequent environmental crisis, the now flourishing landscape and its abundant wildlife population remain at risk. The 120 hard-working anti-poaching scouts responsible for defending this habitat on a daily basis have recently received reinforcements in the form of four enthusiastic new recruits

Radar, Tony, DJ and Popo are the founding members of a brand new canine unit, responsible for detecting highly valued and trafficked wildlife contraband. The two chocolate Labrador mixes and two Belgian Malinois are rescue dogs from the United States who have been expertly trained by our partner, Working Dogs for Conservation (WD4C), to sniff out ivory, rhino horn, pangolin scales, ammunition, bush meat and snares, as well as to track people from the scene of a crime

 

 

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